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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
front with afghanistan, pakistan and the rest of the region. >> i think a formal accord would be desirable, i agree entirely. even so, it would probably be a fig leaf rather than an actual settlement to the problem there. if we don't get it or can't get it, that shouldn't stop us from going away. >> one of the things you point out in the piece which i thought was very striking was that there was all this opposition and huge intense opposition in this country to the bombing of cambodia because that was seen as crossing an international border. of course, we do that every week now in our drone attacks in pakistan which is it functionally exactly the same thing? pakistan has become a safe haven just as cambodia was and we follow in hot pursuit as it were. >> anyone who watches a war movie, when you have a tactical retreat, you leave one guy behind to cover and shoot. that's what you have to do militarily on the ground even as we're pilling out our forces, we should be striking hard and aggressively so the enemy can't follow our tracks and come right in. you're absolutely right, t
. one of the big problems is pakistan and a lot of the leadership resides in pakistan. we have to have a realistic assessment of the true assessment in pakistan, because there's no doubt that there is connections between isi and the aconnie network who are responsible not only for the hotel tragedy there, but also for the attacks on americans and our allies. and that's not acceptable. >> to libya now. we have seen in the middle east and elsewhere that often when there is the removal of a leader that chaos ensues. we certainly saw that in iraq to a certain extent we're still seeing it in egypt. do you think the u.s. and northern african countries have any kind of plan on what would happen and what they would do about likely chaos is moammar gadhafi should leave. the man has chemical weapons. he has ground to air missiles. all of those, as you know, could fall into the wrong hands. what is the u.s. plan here? >> i think the u.s. plan there is to provide assistance and do the things that, in fact, i would have recognized the transition national council a long time ago as a legitimate voic
4th weekend. that is the materials that came out of osama bin laden's home in pakistan. there is evidence as late as february 2010 bin laden wanted strikes in the u.s., particularly around symbolic holidays. are you more concerned than you usually would be about this weekend or are you feeling reasonably steady that this looks like a weekend that we are well prepared for? >> i would almost say all of the above. i do feel reasonably secure because we have increased security as far as alerting local governments, alerting the private sector. there is no doubt we do know al qaeda was talking more about attacking the u.s. on symbolic dates. also in the lead up to 9/11, the tenth anniversary of september 11th, we know they are considering, trying to plan attacks. having said that, i'm not aware of any particular attack being planned right now. we do know they are looking for symbolism. they want to do something dramatic before september 11th. obviously, fourth of july would be a prime time for that. everyone has been alerted to be on extra guard, to be much more careful. beca
. outpost caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, then every few days, this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic. they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are getting attacked from all sides. >> come on, hustle up. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming fortal ban talibae hills. but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> go, go, go! >> reporter: they arrange cover from heavy machine guns. but the bullets are too close. locals scatter. just before huge american fire power has the last word. four massive air strikes across the hills and then the taliban fall silent. america knew why it came here, but isn't sure why it's staying. >> can we get like a police call for like cigarette butts? >> absolutely. >> reporter: ten minutes later, jets swoop into strafe the hills. a show of force for the taliban are now either gone or dead, at least five killed by the soldiers count. the next morning, it
also helping christians that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we help christians who are suffering all throughout the middle east. >> and how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business who donates to you? >> of course. but you see, a lot of the times if you disclose information who you're helping, it end up biting. >> reporter: the business in fact shoebat leaves to his manager keith davies who was down the hall selling shoebat's anti-islam books. when cnn had specific questions about the business, like perhaps the names of the high-ranking generals and experts he says are on his board of advisors, well, shoebat said get the names from davies. >> walid said that you would be able to tell us about your advisory board. you guys said you have generals and other high-ranking officials? >> correct. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i'm trying to think. names gone blank. they'll come back to me in a second. major general -- i can't remember. four star -- a three star general of the air force. irish
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
of pakistan. they're in yemen. they're in somalia. they're all the way across north africa in a growing movement that's now reaching down into the western part of africa. and so just objectively you really don't need an opinion. you just need to look at the facts, sir. al qaeda is much bigger and much more geographically dispersed than it was at 9/11. >> chad, would you agree with that? and what kind of operations are we talking about in places like algeria and eenggypt compared t what they had in afghanistan when they had the harboring government of the taliban? >> i couldn't agree more with michael. and i'd actually go a step further to say not only is he right that they have now expanded geographically and have multiple launch points for operations but if we step back and look at that map you'll see it lays over very nicely with what we're witnessing with the arab spring. we're also witnessing a dysfunctional nato operation both in afghanistan as well as in libya that leads to openings for al qaeda there. as michael points out, they in each one of those countries are seeing instabili
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)